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Slang meaning of Yessum

Yessum means: Old Slavery Slang For “Yes Madam” Or “Yes Master”
“Yes My Master”

What is the slang meaning/definition of Yessum ?

Yessum (2) means: Old Slavery Slang For “Yes Madam” Or “Yes Master”
“Yes My Master”

Slang definition of Yessum

Yessum (2) means: Old Slavery Slang For “Yes Madam” Or “Yes Master”
“Yes My Master”

More meanings / definitions of Old Slavery Slang For “Yes Madam” Or “Yes Master”
“Yes My Master” or words, sentences containing Old Slavery Slang For “Yes Madam” Or “Yes Master”
“Yes My Master”?

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Slavocracy (n.): The persons or interest formerly representing slavery politically, or wielding political power for the preservation or advancement of slavery.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Slang (): of Sling

Slanged (imp. & p. p.): of Slang

Slanging (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Slang

Slang (): imp. of Sling. Slung.

Jargonist (n.): One addicted to jargon; one who uses cant or slang.

Peg (n.): A step; a degree; esp. in the slang phrase "To take one down peg."

Flash (n.): Slang or cant of thieves and prostitutes.

Slang (n.): A fetter worn on the leg by a convict.

Little-ease (n.): An old slang name for the pillory, stocks, etc., of a prison.

Capper (n.): A by-bidder; a decoy for gamblers [Slang, U. S.].

Slang (n.): Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory.

Slaveries (pl. ): of Slavery

Pigskin (n.): The skin of a pig, -- used chiefly for making saddles; hence, a colloquial or slang term for a saddle.

Proslavery (a.): Favoring slavery.

Slaveborn (a.): Born in slavery.

Proslavery (n.): Advocacy of slavery.

Chain (v. t.): To keep in slavery; to enslave.

Antislavery (n.): Opposition to slavery.

Antislavery (a.): Opposed to slavery.

Slavery (n.): The holding of slaves.

Cant (n.): Vulgar jargon; slang; the secret language spoker by gipsies, thieves, tramps, or beggars.

Argot (n.): A secret language or conventional slang peculiar to thieves, tramps, and vagabonds; flash.

Servage (n.): Serfage; slavery; servitude.

Slaveholding (a.): Holding persons in slavery.

Mancipation (n.): Slavery; involuntary servitude.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Old Slavery Slang For “Yes Madam” Or “Yes Master”
“Yes My Master”?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Old Slavery Slang For “Yes Madam” Or “Yes Master”
“Yes My Master”

Meaning of Yessum

Yessum means: Old Slavery Slang For “Yes Madam” Or “Yes Master”
“Yes My Master”

Meaning of Aye!

Aye! means: – “Yes!”

Meaning of Gentleman of Four Outs

Gentleman of Four Outs means:  When a vulgar, blustering fellow asserts that he is a gentleman, the retort generally is, “Yes, a gentleman of four outs,” that is, without wit, without money, without credit, and without manners.

Meaning of Arrr!

Arrr! means: This is often confused with “arrrrgh,” which is, of course, the sound you make when you sit on a belaying pin. “Arrrr!”, like “Aloha,” means variously, “yes,” “I agree,” “I’m happy,” “I’m enjoying this beer,” “My team is going to win it all,” “I saw that television show, it sucked!” and “That was a clever remark you or I just made.” And those are just a few myriad possibilities of Arrr!

Meaning of Arrr!

Arrr! means: – This is often confused with “arrrrgh,” which is, of course, the sound you make when you sit on a belaying pin. “Arrrr!”, like “Aloha,” means variously, “yes,” “I agree,” “I’m happy,” “I’m enjoying this beer,” “My team is going to win it all,” “I saw that television show, it sucked!” and “That was a clever remark you or I just made.” And those are just a few myriad possibilities of Arrr!

Meaning of Boy

Boy means: Originated during slavery. Used to belittle blacks.

Meaning of Swamp-Runner

Swamp-Runner means: Blacks running from slavery

Meaning of Remote Control

Remote Control means: Remotes are black and they do things for you. (slavery)

Meaning of Strange Fruit

Strange Fruit means: Coined by Blacks during slavery to refer to other Blacks who were hanged from trees. Used in a Billie Holiday song during the Civil Rights movement. See: Apple (2).

Meaning of Pickaninny

Pickaninny means: From the days of slavery. Three possible origins: The slave owners would "pick a nincompoop" from the lineup of slaves; or the slave children who couldn't pick cotton "ain't pickaninny"; in some parts of the south, breasts are referred to as ninnys, so pickaninny was a reference to blacks being used as wetnurses.

Meaning of fag

fag means: 1 n cigarette. In very widespread use. One of the most amusing emails I’ve had concerning this word was from an American who had arrived at her company’s U.K. offices to be told that the person she was looking for was “outside blowing a fag.” 2 n first year senior-school kids who have to perform menial tasks (cleaning boots, running errands and the like) for the seniors (slightly antiquated). Another email tells me of a man who was met with aghast looks when he told a group of New Yorkers that he “was a fag at school last year.” Modern thinking on slavery has seen that the practice of fagging all but die out.

Meaning of Wench

Wench means: The word wench literally means young woman or girl. From today's perspective (and for the most part, even in the 18th century) it was used despairingly. The word wench if often used to describe women who worked in taverns and/or brothels. For the most part modifiers were actually added to the word to specify the woman's profession. A female serving patrons of an establishment were serving wenches. At other times it was used to describe any kind of female of the rustic working class (laborers, the poor). When referring to prostitutes or mistresses the word wench would be modified with a noun such as common wench, light wench, wench of the stews, or wanton wench. The word whore was also commonly used to describe prostitutes. Wench dates back to around 1290 when is word that simply meant a young girl or woman. At times it was used as a term of endearment used chiefly in addressing a daughter, wife, or sweetheart.(Far from today's idea of the word) In most movies and works of literary fiction, the wench is pictured as often pretty, scantily dressed and enjoying her chosen profession. While some did fit this description most serving wenches worked long hours, many were widows or among the lowest class of working poor. Their harsh life usually led to poor health and a short life. Often a serving wench would have no choice but to also venture into prostitution in order to afford food and housing. The life of a prostitute is often glamorized in the movies in reality in often led longer work hours, unspeakable diseases, physical abuse, and an even shorter life. In some case, wanton wenches (prostitutes) were forced into the profession. Female African slaves and in some cases white women were forced into the trade. While "white slavery" or forced prostitution was less common that forced African slavery did occur. Despite the portrayal of prostitution in such movies and Pirates of the Caribbean and older movies such as The Black Swan, the life of a tavern wench or prostitute in the 18th century was a miserable intolerable affair. 18th Century Serving Wench. If she were selling more than ale, she could remove the scarf around her neck to show here "wares" and use her apron from a pillow.

Meaning of 18th Century Serving Wench. If she were selling more than ale, she could remove the scarf around her neck to show here "wares" and use her apron from a pillow.

18th Century Serving Wench. If she were selling more than ale, she could remove the scarf around her neck to show here "wares" and use her apron from a pillow. means: Wench: The word wench literally means young woman or girl. From today's perspective (and for the most part, even in the 18th century) it was used despairingly. The word wench if often used to describe women who worked in taverns and/or brothels. For the most part modifiers were actually added to the word to specify the woman's profession. A female serving patrons of an establishment were serving wenches. At other times it was used to describe any kind of female of the rustic working class (laborers, the poor). When referring to prostitutes or mistresses the word wench would be modified with a noun such as common wench, light wench, wench of the stews, or wanton wench. The word whore was also commonly used to describe prostitutes. Wench dates back to around 1290 when is word that simply meant a young girl or woman. At times it was used as a term of endearment used chiefly in addressing a daughter, wife, or sweetheart.(Far from today's idea of the word) In most movies and works of literary fiction, the wench is pictured as often pretty, scantily dressed and enjoying her chosen profession. While some did fit this description most serving wenches worked long hours, many were widows or among the lowest class of working poor. Their harsh life usually led to poor health and a short life. Often a serving wench would have no choice but to also venture into prostitution in order to afford food and housing. The life of a prostitute is often glamorized in the movies in reality in often led longer work hours, unspeakable diseases, physical abuse, and an even shorter life. In some case, wanton wenches (prostitutes) were forced into the profession. Female African slaves and in some cases white women were forced into the trade. While "white slavery" or forced prostitution was less common that forced African slavery did occur. Despite the portrayal of prostitution in such movies and Pirates of the Caribbean and older movies such as The Black Swan, the life of a tavern wench or prostitute in the 18th century was a miserable intolerable affair.

Meaning of POP

POP means: Pop is slang for a carbonated drink, like cola.Pop is slang for take a drug in pill form or as an injection.Pop is slang for to punch, hit.Pop is slang for to give birth.Pop is slang for to have sex with.Pop is slang for to kill.Pop is British slang for to pawn.Pop is British slang for an unspecified distance.Pop is British slang for an orgasm.Pop is British slang for to insult, to scold.Pop is British haulage slang for diesel.

Meaning of CAN

CAN means: Can is slang for a lavatory.Can is slang for a prison or police cell.Can is slang for a beer.Can is British slang for a pocket.Can is naval slang for a depth charge.Can is American slang for the backside.Can is American slang for a safe or strong−box.Can is American slang for dismiss from employment.Can is American slang for suppress or conceal something.Can is American slang for to jail someone.

Slang definitions, words, phrases and meanings

Meaning of THELMA RITTER

THELMA RITTER means: Thelma Ritter is London Cockney rhyming slang for a lavatory (shitter). Thelma Ritter is London Cockney rhyming slang for the anus (shitter).

Meaning of minge

minge means: Noun. The female genitals. Derived from dialect, which ultimately may have its roots in the Romany, minj. [1900s]

Meaning of jubblies

jubblies means: A woman's breasts, usually indicating large breasts. See "melons", "jugs", "funbags"

Meaning of dolt

dolt means: A stupid or foolish person. Simon is a dolt who though Finland was an aquarium.

Meaning of piece

piece means: Girl (offensive). She is a pretty piece, don't you think?

Meaning of taquitos

taquitos means: Ass.

Meaning of Vanilla Coke

Vanilla Coke means: Black people with white personalities.

Meaning of bannock

bannock means: a round cake of bread

Meaning of boy

boy means: Form of address to a male in the South. Bouya! I told you, you couldn't beat me at tennis.

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