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Slang meaning of woolyback, wooly or wool

woolyback, wooly or wool means: Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing.

What is the slang meaning/definition of woolyback, wooly or wool ?

woolyback, wooly or wool (2) means: Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing.

Slang definition of woolyback, wooly or wool

woolyback, wooly or wool (2) means: Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing.

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More meanings / definitions of Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing. or words, sentences containing Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing.?

Wigan (n.): A kind of canvaslike cotton fabric, used to stiffen and protect the lower part of trousers and of the skirts of women's dresses, etc.; -- so called from Wigan, the name of a town in Lancashire, England.

Vicugna (n.): A South American mammal (Auchenia vicunna) native of the elevated plains of the Andes, allied to the llama but smaller. It has a thick coat of very fine reddish brown wool, and long, pendent white hair on the breast and belly. It is hunted for its wool and flesh.

Pallium (n.): A band of white wool, worn on the shoulders, with four purple crosses worked on it; a pall.

Jersey (n.): The finest of wool separated from the rest; combed wool; also, fine yarn of wool.

Course (v. i.): To run as in a race, or in hunting; to pursue the sport of coursing; as, the sportsmen coursed over the flats of Lancashire.

Sponge (n.): A mop for cleaning the bore of a cannon after a discharge. It consists of a cylinder of wood, covered with sheepskin with the wool on, or cloth with a heavy looped nap, and having a handle, or staff.

Cassinette (n.): A cloth with a cotton warp, and a woof of very fine wool, or wool and silk.

Tramway (n.): A railway laid in the streets of a town or city, on which cars for passengers or for freight are drawn by horses; a horse railroad.

Wool (n.): A sort of pubescence, or a clothing of dense, curling hairs on the surface of certain plants.

Tweed (n.): A soft and flexible fabric for men's wear, made wholly of wool except in some inferior kinds, the wool being dyed, usually in two colors, before weaving.

Woolly (a.): Resembling wool; of the nature of wool.

Abb (n.): Among weavers, yarn for the warp. Hence, abb wool is wool for the abb.

Scavenger (v.): A person whose employment is to clean the streets of a city, by scraping or sweeping, and carrying off the filth. The name is also applied to any animal which devours refuse, carrion, or anything injurious to health.

Felt (n.): A cloth or stuff made of matted fibers of wool, or wool and fur, fulled or wrought into a compact substance by rolling and pressure, with lees or size, without spinning or weaving.

Suburb (n.): An outlying part of a city or town; a smaller place immediately adjacent to a city; in the plural, the region which is on the confines of any city or large town; as, a house stands in the suburbs; a garden situated in the suburbs of Paris.

Shawl (n.): A square or oblong cloth of wool, cotton, silk, or other textile or netted fabric, used, especially by women, as a loose covering for the neck and shoulders.

Woolsack (n.): A sack or bag of wool; specifically, the seat of the lord chancellor of England in the House of Lords, being a large, square sack of wool resembling a divan in form.

Rep (n.): A fabric made of silk or wool, or of silk and wool, and having a transversely corded or ribbed surface.

Comber (n.): One who combs; one whose occupation it is to comb wool, flax, etc. Also, a machine for combing wool, flax, etc.

Crepon (n.): A thin stuff made of the finest wool or silk, or of wool and silk.

Knapsack (v. t.): A case of canvas or leather, for carrying on the back a soldier's necessaries, or the clothing, etc., of a traveler.

Tronage (n.): A toll or duty paid for weighing wool; also, the act of weighing wool.

City (n.): A corporate town; in the United States, a town or collective body of inhabitants, incorporated and governed by a mayor and aldermen or a city council consisting of a board of aldermen and a common council; in Great Britain, a town corporate, which is or has been the seat of a bishop, or the capital of his see.

Woolfell (n.): A skin with the wool; a skin from which the wool has not been sheared or pulled.

Woolen (a.): Made of wool; consisting of wool; as, woolen goods.

Blanket (a.): A heavy, loosely woven fabric, usually of wool, and having a nap, used in bed clothing; also, a similar fabric used as a robe; or any fabric used as a cover for a horse.

Cashmere (n.): A dress fabric made of fine wool, or of fine wool and cotton, in imitation of the original cashmere.

Police (n.): A judicial and executive system, for the government of a city, town, or district, for the preservation of rights, order, cleanliness, health, etc., and for the enforcement of the laws and prevention of crime; the administration of the laws and regulations of a city, incorporated town, or borough.

Sewerage (n.): The system of sewers in a city, town, etc.; the general drainage of a city or town by means of sewers.

Amphiscians (n. pl.): The inhabitants of the tropic, whose shadows in one part of the year are cast to the north, and in the other to the south, according as the sun is south or north of their zenith.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing.

Meaning of woolyback, wooly or wool

woolyback, wooly or wool means: Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing.

Meaning of Woozy

Woozy means: Person from Cheshire, Lancashire, Manchester

Meaning of scally *

scally * means: Noun. 1. A miscreant, an irresponsible, self-assured lout, usually male. Abb. of scallywag. This derogatory term has been in prolific use from the early 1990s. 2. A person, usually young, who typically wears casual, brand-name sportswear, such as Nike, Addidas and Reebok etc., baseball caps, and boots, often Rockport. Usually associated with town/city dwellers. * Scally was also a term for a Liverpudlian youth, used in and around Liverpool itself and was possibly the forerunner of the current expression, however the use of it in this form is now rare.

Meaning of LANCASHIRE LASS

LANCASHIRE LASS means: Lancashire lass is northern English rhyming slang for glass.

Meaning of LANCASHIRE LASSES

LANCASHIRE LASSES means: Lancashire lasses is northern English rhyming slang for glasses.

Meaning of COTTON WOOL

COTTON WOOL means: Cotton wool is London Cockney rhyming slang for hunting for sexual quarry (pull).

Meaning of BULLS WOOL

BULLS WOOL means: Bulls wool is Black−American slang for stolen clothes.

Meaning of monkeytown

monkeytown means: Noun. Nickname for the town of Heywood, Lancashire. Derog.

Meaning of Lanky

Lanky means: Noun. 1. The county of Lancashire. 2. The dialect of the county of Lancashire.

Meaning of rat-arsed

rat-arsed means: adj exceedingly drunk. Also abbreviated as simply ratted. Possibly derived from a time when dead rats would be dangled in cider vats to give them extra flavour. At least, according to the person who told me that.

Meaning of antwacky

antwacky means: Adj. Old fashioned. Possibly from antique(y) or antiquated. E.g."Oh no way! I'm not wearing those shoes, they're so antwacky." [Merseyside/West Lancashire use]

Meaning of marrer

marrer means: Friend. A term of endearment in the Lancashire town of Wigan. On meeting a friend a Wigan man would very often greet him with "Alreet marrer", meaning "how are you friend".

Meaning of North-Easter

North-Easter means: Slang term meaning "not entitled", this dates from when ratings stepped up to the pay table only to discover they were not entitled to pay by reason of fines or other debts. This was abbreviated "N.E." on the pay sheet.

Meaning of Linsey Woolsey

Linsey Woolsey means: A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer.

Meaning of At 3

At 3 means: 40 a.m. that morning North Vietnamese Army (NVA) artillery began pounding the city. Elements of the NVA 6th Regiment simultaneously attacked Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV) headquarters in Hue and ARVN 1st Division headquarters. Other NVA troops blockaded Highway 1 north and south of the city and attacked several hundred other sites in the city. By daylight, the Vietcong flag was flying atop the Imperial Citadel of the Nguyen emperors. Hue had fallen to the Communists.

Slang definitions, words, phrases and meanings

Meaning of brassick

brassick means: Adj. See 'boracic'

Meaning of tubular

tubular means: Excellent, outstanding. His new board is tubular, dude.

Meaning of arse bandit

arse bandit means: A homosexual.

Meaning of mojo (1)

mojo (1) means: Black penny chew.

Meaning of plug in the neon

plug in the neon means: To inhale amyl nitrite while having sex.

Meaning of Flat car

Flat car means: Pork chops

Meaning of Narc

Narc means: It stands Narcotics officer but it means loser or goody good

Meaning of Karabast

Karabast means: A Lasat exclamation of frustration. Garazeb Orrelios was fond of using this exclamation.

Meaning of Crioulo

Crioulo means: Brazilian slur for black people

Tags: Slang Meaning of Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing.. The slang definition of Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing.? Please, add a definition of Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing. if you did not find one from a search of Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing..

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